Firefly Fitness with Ken & Jennifer Cornine

Building a Legacy of Health and Happiness


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Body Beast Week 1

Beast Shoulders done!  Now I have completed all of the workouts 1x in this phase and I feel amazing!  (Completely sore, but finally able to make it up & down the stairs in a timely fashion, thanks Sagi Kalev​, 😉  )   It should be worth it- check out this inspiration!

beast3beast2


As far as nutrition I would say that I am finding this the hardest part to master.  The lower carb lifestyle is so deeply engrained in my eating habits that it is a major struggle to find a way to eat 25% protein 50% carbs 25% fat.  This is necessary to do according to the Book of Beast for the Build & Bulk Phase.  I am still working it all out.

The trick for me will be doing the workouts at 5am.  After this type of workout you need to refuel quickly and this should be an unbalanced meal in macro ratios.  3:1 – 5:1 carb to protein ration with very little fat.  For me, that looks like this

1 cup Cheerios

1 Greenberry Smoothie (Greenberry Shakeology, 1c frozen fruit, 1 Tbsp Apple Cider Vinegar & water)

That clocks it at about 300 calories/ 64% carbs

I am still working out the rest of the plan.  Stay Tuned…


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Day 3 Body Beast

10f68a8a47224a6e74049e2e0cf716fbDay 3 of Body Beast is coming to a close and I am whimpering as I type this.  I haven’t been this sore in ages and I am fairly fit!  I had been doing 21 Day Fix Extreme, I LOVE Plyometrics, yet I am still crying the day after leg day.  So that means that I am doing something right.  Right?  As I whine and whimper, my husband reminds me that the first week is the hardest, that I am tearing down and rebuilding muscle, and it will get less painful.  Not pain-free mind you, less painful.

As for the nutrition side of things, I am freaked out about eating 1996 calories, 50% of them carbs.  I had no idea that it would be this hard to eat so many carbs after YEARS of carb deprivation.  But I committed and I will see it through or else I will just end up a fatter, marshmallow from eating so much in Build/ Bulk.  You cannot do the carb loading without the depletion that comes in phase 3.carb-loading

I am so very thankful for the Facebook Groups that I scroll all day for encouragement and for a trainer with such heart in Sagi.  I couldn’t do this without the group support.  As a Beachbody Coach, you would think that I wouldn’t be shocked about how much I rely on group support.  As a facilitator, you get comfortable allaying other people’s fears about starting something new that you have already been through.  It is all familiar and you guide others through with confidence.  This is a whole new depth for me and it makes me FEEL exactly what my challengers feel and how much trust they have to place in me to take the first step.  Just another way that this is a gift for me.

Please comment below your words of advice/encouragement if you have done Beast before, follow me if you want to see the good , the bad & the ugly of my first time around with Body Beast or message me if you think you would like to join me in this Challenge- I would love the company!


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How Body Beast Gets You Result

As I continue through my first week of Body Beast, I find that I am more and more curious about this program and how it came to be.  And most of all, how it works.  Like so many before me, I struggle with an old mentality of less is more when it comes to calories.  For me this is truly a leap of Faith!  If you are curious about how it works, check out this blog post…

Reblogging from The Team Beachbody Blog.

How Body Beast Gets You Result

How Body Beast Gets You Results
“What are you feeding these guys?” said one of the other two judges at the Beachbody Classic, the annual bodybuilding competition held at The Beachbody Summit. “Some of them are ready for their pro cards right now!”

When we partnered with professional bodybuilder Sagi Kalev to create a real home bodybuilding program, we were met with a lot of skepticism. “You can’t get big without an Olympic weight set,” we were told by so-called experts of the industry. We knew they were wrong, we just weren’t sure we could get the public to believe in it. At the Beachbody Classic, the proof was in the proverbial pudding; both men and women had achieved world-class results, at home, without the need for massive weights, squat racks, or even a bench press.

Here’s an inside look at what the program is and how you, too, can become a Beast.

The Team
In our first meeting with Kalev, the conversation revolved around how to get results without a ton of equipment. While Sagi was confident that it could happen, there was no track record of it being done. Bodybuilders, traditionally, are married to the gym. Historically, it’s been such a part of the bodybuilding psyche that no one bothered to consider it.

But Beachbody’s CEO, Carl Daikeler, wasn’t so traditional. He thought only of the untapped potential of those who were too shy, or too busy, to get to the gym every day. If we could come up with an alternative, we could change the entire perception of what it takes to get big.

It’s not like we didn’t have experience, either. Throughout our history we’d seen great results with limited equipment. In fact, armed with nothing but exercise bands, Daikeler had added pounds of muscle using P90X. Even though we’d never focused exclusively on bodybuilding, we’d helped thousands of people add some mass and knew our template for using minimal weight could be expanded.

We also had access to Dr. Marcus Elliott and his P3 team of exercise physiologists. They transformed athletes, so movement is their specialty, but an athlete’s body must also match his or her sport. They knew all the latest science of metabolism and how to grow (or shrink) bodies for optimal performance.

With a solid team in place, research commenced. Strategic meetings, test groups and some good old trial and error followed and, pretty soon, Dynamic Set Training was born.

Dynamic Set Training
It’s long been understood that that muscular hypertrophy (growth) is based on the body’s ability to create hormonal cascades, which translates into an altered metabolism that’s more easily molded into shape. With proper structure, along with strategic eating—a lot of eating—and supplementation, you’ll maximize your body’s ability to gain muscle.

Heavy resistance (a.k.a. weight) has always been a key component of this process. However, continual research has shown that while lifting maximum weight and inducing failure is a vital part of the process, one of the main factors is something referred to as time under tension.

Time under tension is the cumulative amount of time that your muscles spend contracted during a workout. As long as you’re continually pushing your body to its limit, this factor supersedes the actual amount of weight you’re using. Knowing this opened the door for new weight training strategies to maximize time under tension using minimal weight.

This in no way means that only light weight can be used. It’s still vital to stress the body in something called the Phosphocreatine energy system (anaerobic endurance), so you still need enough weight to continually achieve failure. However, the principles of time under tension opened the door to new forms of training, using different styles of sets and cadences that can facilitate anaerobic failure with less weight and equipment than is traditionally used.

If this seems complex it’s because, well, it is. It took a crew of experienced trainers a fair amount of testing to nail it. As scientific as it is, the underlying principles of Dynamic Set Training can be simply explained using one example, called a pre-fatigue set.

Pre-fatigue sets require you to do a low-weight, high-rep set of exercises that targets muscle groups, followed by a heavier set that targets the Phosphocreatine system. For example, a set of push-ups to failure, followed immediately by a set of bench press in which you use the maximum weight in order to fail at 8 to 12 reps. The first set tires out the body so you can achieve anaerobic failure in the second set with less weight than you’d normally use. This turns the entire “superset” into one very long anaerobic set, adding to the overall time under tension of the workout, thus forcing the body’s hormonal response to build muscle.

Over the course of a program, you must continually force the body to adapt to training protocols. What this means is that, as great as pre-fatigue sets are, you can’t just rely on them alone to stress the body’s hypertrophy response. To accomplish this, we needed to come up with an array of training methods that would maximize time under tension, while still forcing anaerobic set failure, the result of which was a stew of different weight training strategies we called Dynamic Set Training.

Turning Stew Into A Meal
A training strategy does not a program make. So while Dynamic Set Training was the vehicle that allowed us to create an approach to building muscle without a literal ton of weight, it needed to be molded into a training program.

Any solid training program includes an overall strategy for exercise, along with diet and supplementation that match. This being Beachbody’s forte, it was a straightforward process, but a program that targets mass is a slightly different animal than a weight loss program. The strategy for Beast had to accommodate both.

The exercise protocol included setting up microcycles, which are your workout schedule for a given week; macrocycles, which are your blocks of training that maximize the adaptation principle; and recovery, so that your body has time to properly build muscle before you hit it again. For Beast we set up two schedules, one for those looking to change their body composition by either gaining or losing weight, and the other for those looking only to gain mass.

Since this article concerns mass, we’ll just focus on the latter schedule. Workouts based on Dynamic Set Training are not enough for an effective program. You have to create workouts that can utilize the theory of progressive overload over time, meaning you need a strategy that stresses the body continually from the time it’s out of shape until its fitness level is peaking. This is the reason there are so many workouts in the program, as well as a training schedule that’s set up in various training blocks.

Essentially, each training block is crafted so that you maximize a training principle known as the specificity of adaptation. Blocks are designed to last a month, but you may do them longer depending on how your body is adapting to your training. When you peak, you move on to the next one.

Of course, as any bodybuilder knows, all of this revolves around diet (including supplementation). Most bodybuilders say that diet is the crux of bodybuilding, especially at first, as you’re attempting to add more mass than is natural for your body.

With this in mind, we created diet and supplementation strategies that work hand in hand in order to make this process as easy as possible. As Sagi states in the guide, it’s not easy, but reviews on our nutrition guide tell us we’ve nailed this, at least as much as we can. Getting big requires that everyone endure a period of eating more than they are comfortable with but, as Sagi says, “I spend one hour a day exercising and 23 hours recovering. What you do in those ‘off’ hours makes all the difference if you want to be a Beast.”


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Q & A With Body Beast Trainer Sagi Kalev

The difference with our Beachbody Community is our Heart.  We have Celebrity Trainers with Heart.  Last night Body Beast creator Sagi Kalev and his soon-to-be bride, superstar coach Barbie Decker took time out of their vacation to get on a phone call with about 200 women to answer all of our questions about tackling Body Beast  as women.  When was the last time you heard of that level of accessibility (outside of the Beachbody Community?)  That is why I love this company and the culture that it created.  8cc359ff6cbd31bd9e3522e56c9cea0e

We all had SOOO many questions.  Will I get bulky?  How do I eat all of that food?  That many (gasp) CARBS?  Read on for some answers and contact me if you have any more or are interested in taking on the Beast yourself!

Summary provided via Facebook & Beachbody Coach  LeeAnn lelmini 
1. Women can not get bulky. Unless you are pumping yourself with testosterone, it’s near impossible. Lifting get’s you cut and shredded, making you look killer in that dress you want to wear


2. Please stop being obsessed with the number on the scale! As you build muscle, your body will tighten. pay more attention to the way you feel when you look in the mirror and how absolutely stunning you are!


3. NUTRITION NUTRITION NUTRITION!!!!!! Don’t create fears or situations in your head before you try it. It is not about calories. Calories are just a guideline. What is important is that you are “WRITING IT DOWN” and really figuring out what foods make you feel good after you eat them. Take notes after you eat to figure out which ones are working for your body and which ones aren’t. You should feel satisfied with your meals, not hungry 30 minutes later or too full. It is about your portions and WHAT you are eating. Follow the book of beast (request a new one from coach relations if you still have the old one) and TRUST the process.


4. More NUTRITION: Carbs are not bad! NO, you can’t eat bagels and waffles and expect to get results. You can get carbs from starchy veggies and other healthier options that are going to fuel your body.


5. It is NOT about losing weight but IS about losing body fat! That comes with pushing yourself in the workouts and following the correct simple nutrition.


6. PUSH YOURSELF! If you can do 10 more reps, you are not pushing hard enough. You want to be working hard during the entire workout, increasing the weights progressively.


7. More cardio is NOT needed to burn fat. The program is at a fast pace and you are going to be burning a lot of calories with it. You can do other programs with it but ensure you are eating enough food.
8. BCAA’s and Glutamine are awesome


9. YOU GOTTA HAVE FUN WITH IT! 

The Beast, who has over 27 years of professional body building experience, has put together this program, taking over 2 careful years to make sure every rep, every recipe, and every part of the guide was strategically formulated to get you results. That’s why it is the number one infomercial on TV… because it works! The winners of the Beachbody Classic 2014 are those who did the Beast program and followed the meal plan to the T! Don’t over-complicate it!


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LOVEGRASS, WEIGHT CONTROL & WHOLE GRAINS

Today we are reblogging from the Whole Grains Council about TEFF.  Of note is that it is a resistant starch which can benefit blood-sugar management, weight control, and colon health.  (See this post)  Which means that you can have your starch and eat it too!

Teff [Eragrostis tef] is the only fully-domesticated member of the genus Eragrostis (lovegrass). Its name is often assumed to be related to the word “lost” in Amharic – because of the tiny size (less than 1mm diameter – similar to a poppy seed) of its seeds.

This tiny size, in fact, makes teff ideally suited to semi-nomadic life in areas of Ethiopia and Eritrea where it has long thrived. (The photo to the left shows teff being harvested in Ethiopia.) A handful of teff is enough to sow a typical field, and it cooks quickly, using less fuel than other foods. Teff also thrives in both waterlogged soils and during droughts, making it a dependable staple wherever it’s grown. No matter what the weather, teff crops will likely survive, as they are also relatively free of plant diseases compared to other cereal crops.

Teff can grow where many other crops won’t thrive, and in fact can be produced from sea level to as high as 3000 meters of altitude, with maximum yield at about 1800-2100m high. This versatility could explain why teff is now being cultivated in areas as diverse as dry and mountainous Idaho and the low and wet Netherlands. Teff is also being grown in India and Australia. In Kansas, theKansas Black Farmers Association is experimenting with teff – intrigued by both its connection to Africa and its market potential.

IGrowing in the fields, teff appears purple, gray, red, or yellowish brown. Seeds range from dark reddish brown to yellowish brown to ivory.

Click here to see photos and learn more about teff.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF TEFF

Teff leads all the grains – by a wide margin – in its calcium content, with a cup of cooked teff offering 123 mg, about the same amount of calcium as in a half-cup of cooked spinach.

Teff was long believed to be high in iron, but more recent tests have shown that its iron content comes from soil mixed with the grain after it’s been threshed on the ground – the grain itself is not unusually high in iron.

Teff is, however, high in resistant starch, a newly-discovered type of dietary fiber that can benefit blood-sugar management, weight control, and colon health. It’s estimated that 20-40% of the carbohydrates in teff are resistant starches. A gluten-free grain with a mild flavor, teff is a healthy and versatile ingredient for many gluten-free products.

Since teff’s bran and germ make up a large percentage of the tiny grain, and it’s too small to process, teff is always eaten in its whole form. It’s been estimated that Ethiopians get about two-thirds of their dietary protein from teff.  Many of Ethiopia’s famed long-distance runners attribute their energy and health to teff.

For a complete survey of the nutritional and health aspects of teff, click here.

COOKING TEFF

In Ethiopia, teff is usually ground into flour and fermented to make the spongy, sourdough bread known as injera. As anyone knows who has eaten at an Ethiopian restaurant anywhere in the world, injera is used as an edible serving plate. Food is piled on a large round of injera on a tray in the middle of the table and different foods are served directly onto the injera. The diners eat by tearing off bits of injera, and rolling the food inside.  Ethiopians also use teff to make porridge and for alcoholic beverages, including tella and katikala.

Today, teff is moving way beyond its traditional uses. It’s an ingredient in pancakes, snacks, breads, cereals and many other products, especially those created for the gluten-free market. You can also buy teff wraps.

White or ivory teff has the mildest flavor, with darker varities having an earthier taste. Those who have only tasted teff in injera assume it has a sour taste, but when it is not fermented (made into a sourdough), teff has a sweet and light flavor.

How you cook teff depends on how you like to eat it, according to our WGC Culinary Advisors. Lorna Sass advises “dry cooking” teff for 6-7 minutes, with 1 cup of teff in 1 cup of water, then letting it stand covered for five minutes. Her approach results in a grain “with the texture of poppy seeds” that’s great for sprinkling on vegetables as a topping, or for adding to soups. Robin Asbell suggests cooking teff for about 20 minutes, with 1 cup of teff in 3 cups of water producing a creamier end product. The Teff Company, in Idaho, advises cooking 1 cup of teff in 3 cups of water or stock.

Here are some recipes you can try, to get acquainted with teff:

Banana Bread with Teff and Chocolate

Teff Crepes with Spinach and Mushrooms

Teff Waffles

Ethiopian Teff Vegetable Loaf

You can easily buy teff grain and teff flour. Three good sources are The Teff Company, Bob’s Red Mill and Shiloh Farms.

FUN FACTS ABOUT TEFF

  • Just one pound of teff grains can grow an acre of teff, while 100 pounds or more of wheat grains are needed to grow an acre of wheat.
  • Teff requires only 36 hours to sprout, the shortest time of any grain.
  • Three thousand grains of teff weigh just one gram (1/28 of an ounce).
  • Teff’s protein content (around 14%) is largely easily digested albumins (similar to a vegetable version of egg whites).
  • Teff is thought to have originated in Ethiopia about 4000-1000 B.C.E.
  • Teff is fermented by a symbiotic yeast living in the soluble fiber on the grain’s surface (like the blush on grapes).

Thanks to The Teff Company for some of the information on this page, including the harvest photo.


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Got Matcha?

I’ve been hearing so much about Matcha lately that it got my curiosity peaked. So just how healthy is the green powder?

According to Yahoo Health, “A study found that one serving of matcha has 137 times more disease-fighting polyphenols, called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), than a brewed mug of conventional China Green Tips — the equivalent of up to 10 cups of regular green tea! With such an antioxidant punch, it’s no wonder that matcha just may be the new superfood.” Read on for why it could just be a miracle in a mug.

Turns out people add it to baked goods, cereals, smoothies or drink it with hot water and honey. I’ll give it a try in my morning Greenberry Smoothie with apple cider vinegar, flax and pineapple.

A quick recap tells us that it is a disease-fighting, detox-inducing, jitter free energy boost that helps you lose weight. Sounds like it is worth giving a try to me. Here is an amazing sounding recipe found on thehealthymaven.com that I plan on giving a try.

matchaballs

 

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Add dates and almonds to a food processor and process until they come together into a sticky ball.
  2. Break up ball and add in cocoa powder, matcha powder and almond milk.
  3. Process until all ingredients have been combined and form into a large sticky ball again.
  4. Roll into 10 small balls and dust with more matcha powder.
  5. Store in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks or longer in freezer.


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PASTA IS GOOD FOR MY WAISTLINE?????!!!!! RICE????!!! POTATOES?????!!!!

WHY HASN’T ANYONE SHOUTED THIS FROM THE ROOFTOPS?

According to a BBC.com article in 2014, they did just that. I guess I wasn’t paying attention. Even if I had been, I surely would have been skeptical. It goes against everything we’ve been told so far. And that is exactly why I took another look.

pasta-al-limone-with-ricotta-cheese

As it turns out, popular science doesn’t tell the whole story. We all agree that pasta, potatoes, and rice are all carbohydrates. We agree that once they hit your stomach they are absorbed as simple sugars, which in turn makes your blood sugar soar. This triggers a release of insulin to combat all of that sugar. Then we enter the “carb coma”. Our sugar levels decrease rapidly and we lose our energy. We know that too much free roaming sugar in our blood is unhealthy as is the rollercoaster of glucose-insulin response. Sugar that isn’t used up in the form of energy makes us fat. That must mean that pasta makes us fat. Period. This is why we are encouraged to eat carbs rich in fiber to slow that ride down. Are you with me so far? Good.

Now Let’s talk “resistant starch”.

pastaResistant starch, according to http://www.shape.com/healthy-eating/diet-tips/lowdown-resistant-starch, “is a carbohydrate your body can’t digest. It behaves a lot like fiber, helping food move through your system, says Mary Ellen Camire, Ph.D., University of Maine food science professor.”

Wait, what????? “Like fiber, resistant starch helps control blood sugar and keeps you regular. It also acts as a prebiotic, nourishing healthy gut microbes. Those bacteria then produce a type of fatty acid that may protect against cancer.”

This could be revolutionary. Back to pasta… So, according to scientist Dr Denise Robertson, from the University of Surrey, “if you cook and cool pasta down then your body will treat it much more like fibre, creating a smaller glucose peak and helping feed the good bacteria that reside down in your gut. You will also absorb fewer calories, making this a win-win situation.”

Even better, the surprise came when the doctors decided to do an experiment. You can read all of the details here. I am excited to report that they found something that I really didn’t expect – cooking, cooling and then reheating the pasta had an even more dramatic effect; an even smaller effect on blood glucose! In fact, it reduced the rise in blood glucose by 50%.

 

Mushroom-Spinach-and-Artichoke-Lasagna