Firefly Fitness with Ken & Jennifer Cornine

Building a Legacy of Health and Happiness


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May I Help You…?

Balance

I recently came across a post in a group that I am a part of that truly spoke to me and struck a chord in my heart. I truly believe that it is our higher purpose to serve others above all else and I have wanted to do something very special for sometime. Along comes this inspiration…

October is my birth month and to honor the gift of health and vitality that has been given to me, I have decided to use those gifts and serve 31 other women in the month of October- completely and totally free of charge.

My reason for 31 is twofold; one for each day of the month and the other is for Proverbs 31. My goal is for each woman to be “clothed in strength and dignity”, laugh without fear of the future” and “make strong her arms” and with that our health, hearts and souls.

What am I offering?
100% FREE Coaching for the month of October including
– a 30 minute Getting Started Right Call to identify your big “Why”, roadblocks and plan of action
– a nutritional assessment
– health check-in
-customized meal plans
– exclusive support group and accountability partners
– Prizes
-Guest speakers

YOU have to do the hard part and decide that NOW is your time and you are worthy of the self-love and attention. I am accepting the first 31 women to declare October as their month. Is it you? Comment below with your email address and I will get you setup. Share this post with someone you love who needs a boost. There are no strings, purchases or upsells. It is my gift to you. What do you have to lose?
xoxoxo- jennifer


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“Hello my name is Jennifer & I CRAVE Chocolate”

I have been following a different workout program that I LOVE.  I don’t love the nutrition side of it though and I have been deeply conflicted about it.  As a Healthy Lifestyle Coach, I PREACH “Follow the program as it was written.”  Problem is that the way this one was written feels WRONG for my brain.

I have a sugar addicted brain.  The real deal-as in cravings that will be relentless and zap my energy and make me moody and sad and defeated kind of addicted brain- so a diet made up of 50% carbohydrates is not a healthy choice for me.  So with much trepidation, I have decided to bag the carb-loading lifestyle after 3 weeks (and 4 lbs) and go back to my nutritional sweet spot (pun intended).  I do plan to continue with those killer workouts and share my progress as the challenge continues.

In the meantime, I have to deal with the carb brain and sometimes that means tricking it.  My solution is here:  Clean Eating Almond Butter Cups.  (Kid approved!)

homemade-peanut-butter-cups

1/2 cup coconut oil
1/2 cup high quality cocoa powder
1/2 cup smooth almond butter
1/4 cup raw honey or maple syrup
1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Melt coconut oil.  Blend all ingredients together in a food processor or blender.  Pour into paper-lined muffin tin cups or silicon muffin cups and fill half-inch full.  Makes 20.   Chill for 30 minutes or freeze for 10 minutes.  When firm, remove.  Store in a sealed container in the refrigerator.  Mmm-mm!

2 little cups of goodness are 146 calories/14.6 grams fat/2.8 grams carbs/1.6 grams protein/ 1.4 grams fiber

If you would like to see what I’m cooking this week, I post my recipes on my Pinterest board here.https://www.pinterest.com/JenniferCornine/this-weeks-meal/.  I am following the 21 Day Fix Nutrition Guide and would love to share more with you about it.  Just message me or find me on Facebook!

“Public shaming as a blood sport has to stop, and it’s time for an intervention…”

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I was clicking around last night before turning in, as many of us do, and I came across a blog post that contained a plea to end cyberbullying and a reference to a TED Talks in Vancouver in March titled Monica Lewinsky: The price of shame.  It opened with this,

“As TED’s social media editor, I have seen a lot of nasty comments. I’ve seen grown men and women deride a 14-year-old girl for her choice of dress. I’ve seen them say they’re revolted by a beautiful transgender woman. On every talk about race, I’ve seen a slew of racist comments. But none have ever been as bad as the comments we got when we published Monica Lewinsky’s TED Talk, The Price of Shame. At least at first.”

I remembered that time in our history when a young girl was vilified at the hand of voyeurism in the name of national security.  I can guarantee that my thoughts on this today are very different from what they were at the time.  I didn’t understand fully the implications of public shaming or even recognize it for what it was then.   The 1990’s brought the internet mainstream and the birth of instant updates, for good and for evil.  I read the post with interest and thought the message was a good one, I recommended it on my Facebook timeline with the disclaimer that I hadn’t watched the talk yet.

I watched the TED Talk today.  And I cried.  Take a look:  

From the transcript:

Public shaming as a blood sport has to stop, and it’s time for an intervention on the Internet and in our culture.  The shift begins with something simple, but it’s not easy. We need to return to a long-held value of compassion — compassion and empathy. Online, we’ve got a compassion deficit, an empathy crisis.”

Ms. Lewinsky continues:  “Researcher Brené Brown said, and I quote, “Shame can’t survive empathy.” Shame cannot survive empathy. I’ve seen some very dark days in my life, and it was the compassion and empathy from my family, friends, professionals, and sometimes even strangers that saved me. Even empathy from one person can make a difference. The theory of minority influence, proposed by social psychologist Serge Moscovici, says that even in small numbers, when there’s consistency over time, change can happen. In the online world, we can foster minority influence by becoming upstanders. To become an upstander means instead of bystander apathy, we can post a positive comment for someone or report a bullying situation. Trust me, compassionate comments help abate the negativity. “

The talk ends with, We talk a lot about our right to freedom of expression, but we need to talk more about our responsibility to freedom of expression… Just imagine walking a mile in someone else’s headline.”

It is an important talk and perhaps one that I would not have come across had it not been for those spewing enough hate to spur TED to start a campaign within a campaign to end cyber bullying.  So I’m doing my part here and now by sharing.  My call to action:  Please share this message and start a conversation today.


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#Endstigma

I woke up this morning and like any other morning scrolled my news feed while drinking my coffee.  I ran across a PLAYBUZZ.com quiz like so many others that are popular amongst my Facebook friends.  I have taken these as well

which-badass-historical-woman-are-youwhich-disney-fairy-are-you

and posted my results and giggled or rolled my eyes with the rest of them.  But today was different.

 

Today’s Quiz Du Jour was “How Bipolar Are You?”

how-bipolar-are-you
As you can imagine many people took the quiz and jokes ensued.  Except it isn’t funny.  Now my disclaimer belongs bolded here.

I was guilty of using the term in a derogatory manner myself…until I was diagnosed with Bipolar Type 2.  And then it wasn’t funny anymore.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health,

”Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and the ability to carry out daily tasks. Symptoms of bipolar disorder can be severe. They are different from the normal ups and downs that everyone goes through from time to time. Bipolar disorder symptoms can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. But bipolar disorder can be treated, and people with this illness can lead full and productive lives.

Bipolar disorder often appears in the late teens or early adult years. At least half of all cases start before age 25.1 Some people have their first symptoms during childhood, while others may develop symptoms late in life.

Bipolar disorder is not easy to spot when it starts. Some people suffer for years before they are properly diagnosed and treated. Like diabetes or heart disease, bipolar disorder is a long-term illness that must be carefully managed throughout your life.”

 

In other words, Bipolar is a serious, life-threatening disorder that is genetically linked, biologically based and while there is no cure, it is infinitely treatable.  And totally misunderstood.

The stigma that follows mood disorder is tragic.  It causes people to hide in the shadows and avoid treatment for fear of being “outed”.  I used that term recently myself.  Outed.  The fear is based in reality as evidenced in the comments on that quiz.  It is one of the largest barriers to treatment out there.  Like a huge elephant.

Having bipolar in 2015 reminds me of the time that cancer was scary and misunderstood.  Remember the movie “Terms of Endearment”?  The stigma that surrounded cancer in the era in which the story took place was real.  I saw the movie with my mother.  I didn’t know then that cancer would take her life 15 years later.  And I thank God that we were supported and loved through it all.  Yet today I wonder why we don’t support families dealing with mental illness in the same gentle manner.  The thing is, you would never have a quiz that spurred jokes about cancer or autism.  No pop quizzes asks “Are you Autistic?” or “Are You Diabetic?” and then generate hilarious responses.

I don’t point this out to judge; I misused the terms myself pre-diagnosis.  I point this out to start a conversation and ask you to think about how you can help end the stigma once and for all.  Treatment does exist.  Life does get better.  In fact, bipolar life, for me, is beautiful.life-is-beautiful