Firefly Fitness with Ken & Jennifer Cornine

Building a Legacy of Health and Happiness


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Monday can be a WONDERFUL DAY!

11218172_883444705026480_2893540257526851936_nGood Morning & Happy Monday! Today is typically that day of the week where good intentions are set. Mondays always feel like a fresh start for me- kind of like the first day of school (which is fast approaching!) or a small New Year’s Day. I was talking with someone recently who was so frustrated and just bone-tired of starting over. I told them that it doesn’t matter HOW MANY TIMES you start again, just that you do. How many people vow to stop smoking, drinking, overeating with remorse from the weekend every Monday- so much so that they’ve come to dread Mondays? (I know I’ve been there!) But…Monday can be a WONDERFUL DAY! Don’t stop making vows to change something in your life. Every step you take forward counts. If you fall off course, dust yourself off and start again; just don’t wait for another Monday to recommit.

Here are a few tips to get you started:
1. Do something right now- the next right thing that you can think of and call that a fresh start.
2. Get an accountability partner. Connect with a supportive community.
3. Make a plan to succeed. Prep. Plan for road bumps (they will be there.)
4. Don’t let other people tell you what you are capable of following through on. Other people’s opinions of you are none of your business. REPEAT DAILY.
5. Above all else- be kind to yourself; be proud. But be accountable to YOU. Have the courage to start.

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Today I decided to take a stand. You can too…

Today I decided to take a stand.  Health & Wellness is my PASSION.  I am often frustrated by the fact that so many people are more willing to spend their hard-earned cash on makeup or pizza or cocktails than on their own or their family’s health and well-being.  I truly don’t mean to insult anyone, but after watching this today, I can’t help but ask the question “WHERE ARE OUR PRIORITIES?”

This talk was recorded in 2010, it is now 5 years later and the statistics are WORSE than ever.  NJ’s obesity rate is on the rise- especially in children.  In NJ,  THE STATE-LEVEL ESTIMATED ANNUAL OBESITY ATTRIBUTABLE EXPENDITURES IS $4447 MILLION.  (That is the latest statistic I found.  It is from 2009.)

obesity stat

Overweight and obese individuals are at increased risk for many diseases and health chronic conditions, including the following:

  • Hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Osteoarthritis (a degeneration of cartilage and its underlying bone within a joint)
  • Dyslipidemia (for example, high total cholesterol or high levels of triglycerides)
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Gallbladder disease
  • Sleep apnea and respiratory problems
  • Some cancers (pancreas, kidney, prostate, endometrial, breast, and colon)

Here is my not-so-subtle call to action:

Please let me help your family get your health back on track AND/OR join me to help others reclaim their health.  It is simple, not easy- but simple.  Let’s #endthetrend together!

Please leave a comment below so I can contact you on how to get started on the road to Health!


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Fight Human Trafficking & Get Healthy this May!

Join me in getting healthy this month for a great cause!   For the remainder of this week Carl Daikeler, CEO of Beachbody has decided to donate $10 of every 21 Day Fix Challenge Pack to the International Justice Mission in order to combat human trafficking.  IJM is an organization close to the hearts of Beachbody’s coaches and one that we are proud to support.

ijm_2014_0

Want to know more about the 21 Day Fix?  Read on…

With 21 Day Fix, losing weight has never been simpler—or faster! Anyone can have success with this simple program. It’s sure to bring you amazing opportunities for expanding your customer base, so here are some key points to remember.

What is 21 Day Fix?

• A 21-day program of simple portion control and 30-minute workouts that anyone can do • Simple, fast weight loss—no weighing food or counting calories, carbs, or points • You can lose up to 15 pounds in 21 days

What makes 21 Day Fix unique?

• Portion-control containers take all the guesswork out of losing weight • It’s the simplest way to control how much you eat • 30-minute workouts that anyone can do and fit into everyone’s busy life

What’s included?

•7 color-coded portion-control containers • Shakeology® shaker cup • 6 easy-to-follow 30-minute workouts • 21 Day Fix Start Here quickstart guide and workout calendar • 21 Day Fix Eating Plan that shows you exactly what to do • 3 Day Quick Fix Guide, Autumn’s secret weapon for fast weight loss • Dirty 30 bonus workout • Exclusive FREE bonus workout—Plyo Fix (a $19.95 value)

How does it work?

• The Eating Plan shows you how to use the portion-control containers • Simply put your choice of food in the color-coded container—if it fits, you can eat it! • Do one 30-minute workout per day according to the Fitness Guide • Follow the simple plan, and you can lose up to 15 pounds in 21 days.

I hope that you will join me and fill out this challenge group application for more information.


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LOVEGRASS, WEIGHT CONTROL & WHOLE GRAINS

Today we are reblogging from the Whole Grains Council about TEFF.  Of note is that it is a resistant starch which can benefit blood-sugar management, weight control, and colon health.  (See this post)  Which means that you can have your starch and eat it too!

Teff [Eragrostis tef] is the only fully-domesticated member of the genus Eragrostis (lovegrass). Its name is often assumed to be related to the word “lost” in Amharic – because of the tiny size (less than 1mm diameter – similar to a poppy seed) of its seeds.

This tiny size, in fact, makes teff ideally suited to semi-nomadic life in areas of Ethiopia and Eritrea where it has long thrived. (The photo to the left shows teff being harvested in Ethiopia.) A handful of teff is enough to sow a typical field, and it cooks quickly, using less fuel than other foods. Teff also thrives in both waterlogged soils and during droughts, making it a dependable staple wherever it’s grown. No matter what the weather, teff crops will likely survive, as they are also relatively free of plant diseases compared to other cereal crops.

Teff can grow where many other crops won’t thrive, and in fact can be produced from sea level to as high as 3000 meters of altitude, with maximum yield at about 1800-2100m high. This versatility could explain why teff is now being cultivated in areas as diverse as dry and mountainous Idaho and the low and wet Netherlands. Teff is also being grown in India and Australia. In Kansas, theKansas Black Farmers Association is experimenting with teff – intrigued by both its connection to Africa and its market potential.

IGrowing in the fields, teff appears purple, gray, red, or yellowish brown. Seeds range from dark reddish brown to yellowish brown to ivory.

Click here to see photos and learn more about teff.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF TEFF

Teff leads all the grains – by a wide margin – in its calcium content, with a cup of cooked teff offering 123 mg, about the same amount of calcium as in a half-cup of cooked spinach.

Teff was long believed to be high in iron, but more recent tests have shown that its iron content comes from soil mixed with the grain after it’s been threshed on the ground – the grain itself is not unusually high in iron.

Teff is, however, high in resistant starch, a newly-discovered type of dietary fiber that can benefit blood-sugar management, weight control, and colon health. It’s estimated that 20-40% of the carbohydrates in teff are resistant starches. A gluten-free grain with a mild flavor, teff is a healthy and versatile ingredient for many gluten-free products.

Since teff’s bran and germ make up a large percentage of the tiny grain, and it’s too small to process, teff is always eaten in its whole form. It’s been estimated that Ethiopians get about two-thirds of their dietary protein from teff.  Many of Ethiopia’s famed long-distance runners attribute their energy and health to teff.

For a complete survey of the nutritional and health aspects of teff, click here.

COOKING TEFF

In Ethiopia, teff is usually ground into flour and fermented to make the spongy, sourdough bread known as injera. As anyone knows who has eaten at an Ethiopian restaurant anywhere in the world, injera is used as an edible serving plate. Food is piled on a large round of injera on a tray in the middle of the table and different foods are served directly onto the injera. The diners eat by tearing off bits of injera, and rolling the food inside.  Ethiopians also use teff to make porridge and for alcoholic beverages, including tella and katikala.

Today, teff is moving way beyond its traditional uses. It’s an ingredient in pancakes, snacks, breads, cereals and many other products, especially those created for the gluten-free market. You can also buy teff wraps.

White or ivory teff has the mildest flavor, with darker varities having an earthier taste. Those who have only tasted teff in injera assume it has a sour taste, but when it is not fermented (made into a sourdough), teff has a sweet and light flavor.

How you cook teff depends on how you like to eat it, according to our WGC Culinary Advisors. Lorna Sass advises “dry cooking” teff for 6-7 minutes, with 1 cup of teff in 1 cup of water, then letting it stand covered for five minutes. Her approach results in a grain “with the texture of poppy seeds” that’s great for sprinkling on vegetables as a topping, or for adding to soups. Robin Asbell suggests cooking teff for about 20 minutes, with 1 cup of teff in 3 cups of water producing a creamier end product. The Teff Company, in Idaho, advises cooking 1 cup of teff in 3 cups of water or stock.

Here are some recipes you can try, to get acquainted with teff:

Banana Bread with Teff and Chocolate

Teff Crepes with Spinach and Mushrooms

Teff Waffles

Ethiopian Teff Vegetable Loaf

You can easily buy teff grain and teff flour. Three good sources are The Teff Company, Bob’s Red Mill and Shiloh Farms.

FUN FACTS ABOUT TEFF

  • Just one pound of teff grains can grow an acre of teff, while 100 pounds or more of wheat grains are needed to grow an acre of wheat.
  • Teff requires only 36 hours to sprout, the shortest time of any grain.
  • Three thousand grains of teff weigh just one gram (1/28 of an ounce).
  • Teff’s protein content (around 14%) is largely easily digested albumins (similar to a vegetable version of egg whites).
  • Teff is thought to have originated in Ethiopia about 4000-1000 B.C.E.
  • Teff is fermented by a symbiotic yeast living in the soluble fiber on the grain’s surface (like the blush on grapes).

Thanks to The Teff Company for some of the information on this page, including the harvest photo.


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PASTA IS GOOD FOR MY WAISTLINE?????!!!!! RICE????!!! POTATOES?????!!!!

WHY HASN’T ANYONE SHOUTED THIS FROM THE ROOFTOPS?

According to a BBC.com article in 2014, they did just that. I guess I wasn’t paying attention. Even if I had been, I surely would have been skeptical. It goes against everything we’ve been told so far. And that is exactly why I took another look.

pasta-al-limone-with-ricotta-cheese

As it turns out, popular science doesn’t tell the whole story. We all agree that pasta, potatoes, and rice are all carbohydrates. We agree that once they hit your stomach they are absorbed as simple sugars, which in turn makes your blood sugar soar. This triggers a release of insulin to combat all of that sugar. Then we enter the “carb coma”. Our sugar levels decrease rapidly and we lose our energy. We know that too much free roaming sugar in our blood is unhealthy as is the rollercoaster of glucose-insulin response. Sugar that isn’t used up in the form of energy makes us fat. That must mean that pasta makes us fat. Period. This is why we are encouraged to eat carbs rich in fiber to slow that ride down. Are you with me so far? Good.

Now Let’s talk “resistant starch”.

pastaResistant starch, according to http://www.shape.com/healthy-eating/diet-tips/lowdown-resistant-starch, “is a carbohydrate your body can’t digest. It behaves a lot like fiber, helping food move through your system, says Mary Ellen Camire, Ph.D., University of Maine food science professor.”

Wait, what????? “Like fiber, resistant starch helps control blood sugar and keeps you regular. It also acts as a prebiotic, nourishing healthy gut microbes. Those bacteria then produce a type of fatty acid that may protect against cancer.”

This could be revolutionary. Back to pasta… So, according to scientist Dr Denise Robertson, from the University of Surrey, “if you cook and cool pasta down then your body will treat it much more like fibre, creating a smaller glucose peak and helping feed the good bacteria that reside down in your gut. You will also absorb fewer calories, making this a win-win situation.”

Even better, the surprise came when the doctors decided to do an experiment. You can read all of the details here. I am excited to report that they found something that I really didn’t expect – cooking, cooling and then reheating the pasta had an even more dramatic effect; an even smaller effect on blood glucose! In fact, it reduced the rise in blood glucose by 50%.

 

Mushroom-Spinach-and-Artichoke-Lasagna